feed all monsters review

Feed All Monsters Review: A Puzzling Treat for the Eyes

7.0 TOTAL SCORE

Feed All Monsters Review

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feed all monsters review

If you like puzzle games that are easy to understand but not too dull that can keep you entertained for a few hours, then this game is most certainly up your alley. The art style is quite good, with flat color shapes making up unique character designs and very adorable-looking monsters. Overall, the game is incredibly pleasing to the eyes, a treat to look at, and very intuitive.

 


Features Rate 7
PROS
  • Easy to pick up and play puzzles that don't get old
  • Lovely visuals and great music
  • 200 levels of content for only $3
CONS
  • Minimal options or accessibility features
  • Music can get slightly repetitive
  • Relatively simplistic gameplay, what you see is what you get

The puzzle genre is one of the most varied in all video games, but one format of this mixed genre is games where you have to draw a line to reach your goal, usually putting some restrictions or spins on this simple premise. Feed All Monsters is one of these games that brings its own adorable aesthetics and unique style to the genre.

In this Feed All Monsters review, I’ll give you a brief overview of this sweet little puzzle game showcased in a Wholesome Direct. If you like puzzle games that are easy to understand but not too dull that can keep you entertained for a few hours, then this game is most certainly up your alley.

tItle screen feed all monsters
The Feed All Monsters Title Screen. – Image by Monica Phillips.

The Apple of My Eye

feed all monsters grasslands
The game has you drawing lines to feed these adorable creatures. – Image by Monica Phillips.

The art style is quite good, with flat color shapes making up unique character designs and very adorable-looking monsters. Everything is drawn with a brush that makes edges appear to be painted very pleasingly, and the actual designs are adorable; the monsters in this game are on the level of Bugsnax cuteness.

The levels and environments are usually very simplistic, making the critical elements stick out more. Things could use a touch of extra animation, looking a little rough here and there, such as characters not reacting or doing anything whenever they step into mold or mud, not even slowing down visually.

Overall, the game is incredibly pleasing to the eyes, a treat to look at, and very intuitive. I was never once confused about what anything is, and even when a lot is going on in a level with a bunch of lines you’ve drawn and level elements all over the place, it never gets confusing because everything stands out and is easy to understand.

A Not So Plain Game

feed all monsters incorrect solution
Characters can end their lines prematurely, though that doesn’t solve this puzzle. – Image by Monica Phillips.

The gameplay is a simplistic line-puzzle game, where you draw a line that can only go so long, trying to make your character feed every monster on screen. Each screen varies in size, and the amount of monsters, and some monsters need more to eat than others. Characters can only start on specific points and can’t overlap lines.

You get three characters throughout the game, each with unique attributes. Melonica can walk for seven tiles but only feed monsters one piece of food at a time. Umarius treads only two tiles but can provide monsters three pieces of food at a time, and Mun-chi is the middle point, walking five tiles and giving monsters two pieces of food.

boss battle feed all monsters
A boss battle against a massive monster slime – Image by Monica Phillips.

There are, in fact, boss battles in this game. They center around one giant monster and usually make you maximize the lines of your character to their fullest extent.

I quite like these; it feels like a brain exercise trying to fit as many pieces in a space as possible, and even more so than usual, finding the correct orientation where it all works feels satisfying.

Overall, this is a pretty great and well-designed puzzle game. It gets decently challenging, but never so much that you’ll be stuck on the same puzzle for so long that you start to resent the game. Each new level brings a unique visual style, music, and a fantastic new gimmick to play around with, making the game always feel fresh and fun.

Bread and Jams

monster bios feed all monsters
A catalog containing pictures and descriptions of all the lovely creatures in this game. – Image by Monica Phillips.

The music is great, usually synthy, bouncy, and upbeat, but it gets repetitive. You’ll probably hear the same song for upwards of 30 minutes. The only variety comes in when you’re on a menu, doing a boss, or changing areas. Some different themes or just making the one piece longer for each site would help shake it up.

The music itself is excellent, though. I’m especially partial to the later areas that have a less poppy and more chill vibe, especially the music in Area 2. It follows a similar style but is usually different enough to give every area its unique feel, but it still feels like part of a cohesive world because of it.

The audio design elsewhere is pretty standard. The characters say a few lines whenever you interact with them; otherwise, sounds are pretty much placed as necessary, and there’s nothing out of the ordinary. Spam-clicking on a character to make them say “yeah” a ton is funny, though. Overall, good audio design and almost no complaints.

200 Simple Steps

world map feed all monsters
The map for just half an area; all these levels actually connect this way when you play them. – Image by Monica Phillips.

This game has an elegant way of increasing the complexity of its puzzles over time. Instead of making ones with more obscure solutions, it’ll usually throw ones that require more out-of-the-box thinking through some unique level gimmicks that can change how you feel about playing the game entirely.

Feeding monsters never gets stale; each new area throws one or two new gimmicks at you. For example, the forest area adds mud that makes you take an extra tile whenever you move over it and mold that takes away one piece of food, requiring you to think more about where you use your lines and making it more than an impassable wall.

Every area will give you new gimmicks to explore, and the puzzles will get more challenging until the final one. Each area has unique aesthetics, music, gimmicks, and new monsters to feed and befriend for your catalog. Overall, this makes for an incredibly satisfying progression from beginning to end.

A Simple Recipe

forest puzzle complete feed all monsters
A finished puzzle that requires using all characters to their fullest extent. – Image by Monica Phillips.

There’s no real story to this game. I’d expect a short opening cutscene, maybe to quickly introduce the characters and the world and give a bit of motivation as to why we’re going out and feeding a bunch of monsters.

The only scraps of the story in this game are from Monster bios. While their artwork is adorable, it mainly just describes that monster and what it does and gives us small tidbits of lore.

The settings are pretty barebones; you can change the sound effects volume and music volume, switch between windowed or fullscreen, and toggle character voices. There’s also nothing in the way of accessibility options, and controllers are entirely unsupported, as far as I know. Overall, a pretty barebones package in terms of options.

The UI and general design of everything in this game are about as simple as expected. You can click on your characters to select them or use the keyboard, and the clicking and dragging show your line, how much food it’s giving, and how many steps you can take. It’s simple, helpful, and effective.

Replayability comes about as you’d expect for most puzzle games, so there is very little. You could replay levels to try and solve them separately, view monster bios, or try to get achievements, and that’s about all there is to do after you’ve finished the main story. The amount of content in that campaign more than makes up for it, though.

The Alternatives

the witness screenshot
Screenshot from The Witness – Image by Monica Phillips.

Since this is a relatively simple puzzle game genre, there are quite a few different games you could play to offer a similar experience to this one. These are just a few I’d recommend:

  • Line Path is a straightforward puzzle game where you drag a line to the goal. Usually, the challenge is not being able to overlap with yourself.
  • LYNE is similar to Line Path but has a more futuristic aesthetic and allows diagonals, making things more complex.
  • The Witness has puzzles that are somewhat similar to this but has a more significant focus on story and aesthetics and is way more complicated.

A Fully Baked Cake

feed all monsters banner
Image from DU&IGames

Score: 7/10

Feed All Monsters is short and sweet and only costs a few dollars. It gives 200 levels of content and delivers a satisfying puzzle experience that’s easy to understand, always staying fresh and adorable to watch. The music is pleasant, the visuals are cute, and the game is worth giving a go if you’re in the mood for a puzzle game.

Pros

  • Easy to pick up and play puzzles that don’t get old
  • Lovely visuals and great music
  • 200 levels of content for only $3

Cons

  • Minimal options or accessibility features
  • Music can get slightly repetitive
  • Relatively simplistic gameplay, what you see is what you get

Feed All Monsters Review:FAQs

Question: What is Feed All Monsters?

Answer: A line-puzzle game where you’re tasked with feeding a bunch of adorable monsters.

Question: How long is Feed All Monsters?

Answer: Since it’s a puzzle game, it’ll take about as long as you take to think things through, but around 5-8 hours on average.

Question: Is Feed All Monsters worth it?

Answer: Given it has a ton of levels and content for only $3, I’d say it’s more than worth your money.

Play Log

Through this review, I put 7.3 hours into this game on Steam, getting almost all of the achievements, all the way through the game’s many levels and feeding a ton of adorable monsters.

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